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GOLF COURSE LAYOUT

Hole 1
Hole 2
Hole 3
Hole 4
Hole 5
Hole 6
Hole 7
Hole 8
Hole 9
Hole 10
Hole 11
Hole 12
Hole 13
Hole 14
Hole 15
Hole 16
Hole 17
Hole 18

Hole 1

Par 4|Index 13
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PRO’S TIP

A daunting but pretty tee shot awaits the golfer as they stand on the first tee at Keppel Club. The large majestic pines down the left side of the fairway gives the hole very much of an ‘Augusta’ feel, but don’t be lost in the beauty because danger lurks down the right side with the risk of going out of bounds.
I recommend a straight shot with a driver or possibly 3-wood down the centre-right of the fairway to avoid the large bunker on the left. The second shot plays half a club longer uphill and looks to make birdie if the flag is on the front section of the green.

Greg Anketell
Member of Singapore & Australian PGA ‘AAA’ Class

Hole 2

Par 4|Index 1
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PRO’S TIP

Along with the eleventh hole, the second hole is where golfers are most prone to racking up a big number. Some players may want to take on the dog leg with a draw, however a slight push and the ball is out of bounds. The smart play would be a 3-wood to the corner which leaves a longer shot into the green, but the second shot plays almost one club less downhill. Aim for the centre of the green regardless of flag position and be very happy to escape with par.

Greg Anketell
Member of Singapore & Australian PGA ‘AAA’ Class

Hole 3

Par 4|Index 3
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PRO’S TIP

Another difficult hole with water left and out of bounds right, requiring a very long and straight shot with a driver. Players should have a middle to short iron over water into quite a long and wide green surrounded by bunkers. Club selection based on pin position is vital on this hole simply because of the depth of the green. Try to avoid right bunkers especially if the flag is cut on the right side of the green.

Greg Anketell
Member of Singapore & Australian PGA ‘AAA’ Class

Hole 4

Par 3|Index 15
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PRO’S TIP

A very strong par-3 from the plates requiring a precise middle to long iron over water to a very large two-tiered green. Special attention must be given to pin position because if you find yourself on the wrong tier, it will most likely result in a three-putt.

Greg Anketell
Member of Singapore & Australian PGA ‘AAA’ Class

Hole 5

Par 5|Index 9
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PRO’S TIP

Probably the best chance for birdie on the course as it is the shortest of the four par-5s, and for the longer hitters, realistically the only par-5 on the course reachable in two. A solid driver aimed at the bunker with a slight fade should leave a fairway wood or hybrid to the green. The second shot is again uphill, so correct club selection is imperative to be able to reach the green in two. For players laying up, beware of the false front and left bunker when hitting approach shots into the green to a front flag position.

Greg Anketell
Member of Singapore & Australian PGA ‘AAA’ Class

Hole 6

Par 3|Index 17
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PRO’S TIP

Probably one of the best and most scenic holes on the course. This hole is beautifully designed with the green tucked into a hill and water completely surrounding the right side of the green with bunkers strategically placed both short and left. Take note of the flag position and wind when choosing a club. Three is a very good score here so the smart play is to take the water out of play and hit to the middle of the green.

Greg Anketell
Member of Singapore & Australian PGA ‘AAA’ Class

Hole 7

Par 4|Index 11
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PRO’S TIP

With out of bounds all along the right side of the fairway, smart players will play their tee shots down the left side of the fairway, even using the steep slope on the left to ensure they keep their ball in play. The hole is only short so some players will look at a 3-wood as an option, but for those longer hitters looking to make birdie, a driver can take you within a short pitch of the green. If the flag is in the front or middle section of the green, a birdie is definitely on the cards. However, if the flag is up the back on the upper tier, the approach shot must be played with caution because any shot over the back of the green is dead.

Greg Anketell
Member of Singapore & Australian PGA ‘AAA’ Class

Hole 8

Par 4|Index 7
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PRO’S TIP

Probably one of the most underrated holes on the course, this challenging and unyielding hole requires a perfect draw with a driver starting at the centre of the fairway and avoiding the out of bounds which runs the entirety of the right side of the fairway. The green here is by far the longest at Keppel measuring at approximately 52m, so ensure that the pin placement is taken into account when selecting your club for your approach into the green. The green, whilst being the longest on the course, is also the narrowest, and anything missing to the right will most likely finish out of bounds so keeping your approach left of the flag is vital.

Greg Anketell
Member of Singapore & Australian PGA ‘AAA’ Class

Hole 9

Par 5|Index 5
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PRO’S TIP

An extremely strong driving hole again with OB all down the right side of the fairway, although players can ‘bail out’ left and use the slope of the left side of the fairway to ensure that their ball is in play. Even for the long hitters, going for the green in two is almost impossible. Players will need to decide how aggressive they would like their lay up to be because of the water that comes into play on the left at about 140m which moves across the fairway at about 90m. The advisable play is to not be too aggressive and take the water out of play, laying up to the 100m marker to set up a nice wedge to a fairly generous green. But players should be aware of the steep slope from back to front on this hole, in particular the right side of the green.

Greg Anketell
Member of Singapore & Australian PGA ‘AAA’ Class

Hole 10

Par 5|Index 6
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PRO’S TIP

The tenth hole requires a strong driver or 3-wood to the middle of the fairway. Longer hitters can go for the green in two, but because of the severity of the uphill, this par-5 will normally play as a three-shot hole. At least half a club needs to be added to the approach with special care not to overshoot the green because anything long will bring doubles and triples into play.

Greg Anketell
Member of Singapore & Australian PGA ‘AAA’ Class

Hole 11

Par 4|Index 2
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PRO’S TIP

Possibly the one hole on the course that brings a good round down more than any other hole. Players should discipline themselves to hit a 3-wood into the middle of the fairway and not be tempted to take on the dog leg to the right with driver. The downhill approach shot from a downhill lie, to a green where the right side is completely surrounded by water must be struck perfectly and to the left side of the green. Par is a great score here.

Greg Anketell
Member of Singapore & Australian PGA ‘AAA’ Class

Hole 12

Par 3|Index 16
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PRO’S TIP

Another one of the great par-3s at Keppel where players need to negotiate the large bunker guarding the front of the green. The safest strategy is play to the right-centre of the green no matter where the pin is placed to best guarantee you par. Attacking the back left flag comes at the players own risk because of the narrow landing area between the front and back bunker.

Greg Anketell
Member of Singapore & Australian PGA ‘AAA’ Class

Hole 13

Par 4|Index 14
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PRO’S TIP

Possibly one of the most important tee shots on the course, many balls have been lost in the ‘Bermuda Triangle’ which is situated between the fairways of 13 and 14. A player MUST hit the fairway here, so a 3-wood or 5-wood struck down the left side of the fairway with a slight fade for position should lead to a middle to short iron into a green that plays almost a club longer uphill. Another longer than average green tends to catch players out so ensure that you have enough clubs in your hand and that you are aware of the pin position.

Greg Anketell
Member of Singapore & Australian PGA ‘AAA’ Class

Hole 14

Par 4|Index 12
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PRO’S TIP

A driver or 3-wood to a narrow fairway where there is more fairway to the right than it looks from the tee. It should also be noted that anything left of the tee is almost guaranteed to be lost. After hitting the fairway, players will have a short iron to a generous green which will play half a club shorter downhill and is a definite birdie chance.

Greg Anketell
Member of Singapore & Australian PGA ‘AAA’ Class

Hole 15

Par 5|Index 4
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PRO’S TIP

A driver or 3-wood down the right side of the fairway is recommended in order to avoid water on the left side of the fairway. This hole plays as a three-shot hole, and players need to pay attention to the second shot lay up because of the water that runs down the left side and then across the fairway at about 100m. The third shot to the green requires a fairly sharp and accurate wedge to avoid the greenside bunkering on both sides.

Greg Anketell
Member of Singapore & Australian PGA ‘AAA’ Class

Hole 16

Par 3|Index 18
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PRO’S TIP

A beautiful short par-3 with a two-tiered green that plays approximately one club shorter, allowing for the downhill. It is extremely important to get the ball on the correct level so players must be aware of pin positions. If the ball is struck to the wrong level, it makes it almost impossible to two-putt.

Greg Anketell
Member of Singapore & Australian PGA ‘AAA’ Class

Hole 17

Par 4|Index 8
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PRO’S TIP

Another challenging tee shot with OB down the entire right side of the fairway, so players are advised to take a driver or 3-wood down the left side of the fairway. The second shot plays slightly uphill, and the key to this hole is to ensure you have the correct number to carry the front bunker. Also be aware that over the back of the green is not great.

Greg Anketell
Member of Singapore & Australian PGA ‘AAA’ Class

Hole 18

Par 4|Index 10
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PRO’S TIP

A 3-wood or driver should be used to position down the right side of the fairway, avoiding the large pot bunker guarding the left side of the fairway. Pay particular attention to the pin placement because 18 is the only hole on the course where the front of the green slopes from front to back.

Greg Anketell
Member of Singapore & Australian PGA ‘AAA’ Class